U.S. Institute of Peace Weekly Bulletin May 27, 2022

 

Weekly Bulletin USIP
Troops with the Gotland regiment of the Swedish Army reload their machine guns during target practice on Gotland Island, Sweden, on May 11, 2022. (Sergey Ponomarev/The New York Times)

Putin’s War Backfires as Finland, Sweden Seek to Join NATO

Motivated by Moscow’s aggression, Finland and Sweden have applied to join NATO, ending decades of their non-aligned status. USIP’s A. Wess Mitchell explores the implications of NATO expansion for the war in Ukraine, Putin’s potential response and what it means for the geopolitics of Europe.

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Russia’s military moves mobile missile launchers in its Arctic region in 2021. The government of President Vladimir Putin has asserted a right to use nuclear weapons in the Ukraine war. (Emile Ducke/The New York Times)

Global Peace Needs a Clear U.S. Reply to Putin’s Nuclear Threat

As signs increase that Russia’s invasion of Ukraine is failing to achieve President Putin’s goals, he has hinted menacingly at using a chemical or nuclear weapon. USIP’s Mary Glantz says ideas for ending Russia’s Ukraine war must sustain deterrence against nuclear or chemical attack.

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Biden’s Asia Trip Looks to Revitalize Alliances, Focus on China

The visit was part of a series U.S. diplomatic initiatives aimed at reassuring allies that even amid the Ukraine Washington is prioritizing the Indo-Pacific region. USIP’s Frank AumMirna Galic and Rachel Vandenbrink discuss the key takeaways and how China factors into U.S. diplomacy in Asia.

For more on the president’s trip and U.S. diplomacy in Asia, listen to Aum on this week’s “On Peace” podcast.

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A plenary session of the 2018 Summit of the Americas in Lima, Peru. (Juan Manuel Herrera/Organization of American States)

Beyond the Summit of the Americas: Resetting U.S. Policy in Latin America

There are concerns that the upcoming Summit of the Americas could spotlight challenges in U.S. regional relations and deficiencies in U.S. policy. Ambassador P. Michael McKinley says that Washington should look beyond the summit and recast its policy to reflect the region's current political realities and priorities.

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: Leaders of the Aboriginal-Australian Yidinji Territory at a weekly meeting in Cairns, Australia, discussing their hopes to sign a treaty with the Australian government. August 7, 2019. (Brook Mitchell/The New York Times)

What Is Indigenous Foreign Policy? Lessons from Australia and New Zealand

To strengthen ties to the Pacific Islands, Australia and New Zealand have sought to “indigenize” their foreign policy. But to avoid perpetuating colonial exploitation, they must ensure Indigenous peoples are given equitable power and mutual respect, say USIP’s Nicole Cochran and Brian Harding.

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People crowd a train in Khartoum, Sudan, on April 23, 2019, during nationwide protests after the overthrow of President Omar al-Bashir earlier that month. (Photo by AP)

Sowing the Seeds of Nonviolent Action in Sudan

This Special Report explores the foundations of Sudan’s 2018-19 December Revolution, tracing the effects of local demand groups, civil society workshops and professional associations on widespread mass participation, opposition unity and movement leadership, and nonviolent discipline.

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